Workshops and Panel Sessions

Keynote & Plenary Session

Workshops

Workshop 1: Monitor Your Habitat with Technology
Monday, November 10
9am-12pm

Connect to your habitat through technology. Find out how Spotfire Software is used to track wildlife in citizen science projects and explore ways that devices such as trail cams and frog callers can help you more accurately assess the wildlife in your habitat.

Moderator: Maaike Schotborgh, Southwest Regional Ecologist, Wildlife Habitat Council

Presenters:

  • “Tech Tools for Habitat Management and Community Engagement,” David Wheeler, Executive Director, Conserve Wildlife Foundation
  • “Use of Trail Cams and Frog Loggers to Collect Data,” Jim Myers, Staff Environmental Engineer, Chevron

Workshop 2: Learn to Plant a Pollinator Garden
Monday, November 10
9am-12pm

This workshop will teach you how to design and establish a pollinator garden for the corporate landscape, and how to connect that garden to the community through outreach programming. This workshop will enable participants to jumpstart corporate/industrial pollinator gardens and an outreach program installation by providing the opportunity to develop initial plans and templates. Participants will walk away connected to the knowledge of the key ways in which corporations can help pollinators, general knowledge of key pollinators, pollinator challenges issues, conservation techniques, and a prototype for pollinator habitat creation. 

Moderator: Sara Barnas, Wildlife Biologist, Wildlife Habitat Council

Presenters

  • “Building a Pollinator Garden,” Dr. Victoria Wojcik, Research Director, Pollinator Partnership; Mary Byrne, Plant Ecologist, Pollinator Partnership

Workshop 3:  STEM Lessons for Your Habitat
Monday, November 10
9am-12pm

Panelists will demonstrate how STEM (Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics) education can be used on corporate habitats and how it can be developed in concert with a local university. Bridgestone’s program in Aiken, South Carolina, will share lessons on how to use the natural environment to teach STEM, while encouraging students to become life-long learners who are connected to the natural world.

Moderator: Julie Napolitano, Education and Event Assistant, Wildlife Habitat Council

Presenters

  • “University and Corporate Partnerships through Outdoor Classrooms,” Monica Key, HR/Community Relations, Bridgestone Americas Tire Operations, Aiken; Gary J. Senn, Associate Professor, University of South Carolina, Aiken

Workshop 4:  Managing Your Urban Forest
Monday, November 10
9am-12pm

Join ExxonMobil to learn how to use i-Tree software to calculate the value of the trees around your site so you can accurately assess their contribution to the environment.  Bartlett Tree Service, which works with The DuPont Company, will also be on hand to demonstrate how to develop a management plan for trees that controls pest infestations and makes the most of your urban forest for wildlife, people, and the environment.

Moderator: Jeff Popp, Land Restoration Manager, Wildlife Habitat Council

Presenters:

  • “Assessing and Managing the Urban Forest to Maximize Environmental Benefits,” Scott Courtright, Senior Forester/Arborist, URDS; Ron Dunham, Senior Environmental Coordinator, ExxonMobil
  • “Connecting People, Trees, and Wildlife with Urban Forestry and Technology ,” Mike Sherwood, Bartlett Inventory Solutions Manager; Pete Kingshill, Arborist Representative:; Kathy Rogers, Site Contract Administrator, DuPont Company

Panel Sessions

Panel Session 1: The Human Element: From Degradation to Restoration
Monday, November 10
10am-12pm

Learn about three distinct case studies where humans have had unmistakable impact on the land over the decades—and see how those lands can be transformed into assets for the human community as well as havens for wildlife and native plant species through science, engineering, and sheer determination to connect to both the natural and the human community.       

Moderator: Rebecca Culler, Education Specialist, Wildlife Habitat Council

Presenters:

  • “Transformation of a Superfund Site to an Ecological Habitat and Outdoor Classroom,” Steve Shestag , Director, Enterprise Remediation, Environment, Health and Safety, The Boeing Company
  • “TVA Kingston Recovery Project: From ashes to Restoration,” Carol E. Eimers, General Manager, Kingston Recovery Project, Tennessee Valley Authority
  • “Connectivity: Landscape Level and Community,” Doug Wood, Wildlife Habitat Committee Member, South Charleston Site-Technology Park, The Dow Chemical Company

Panel Session 2: Ecological Restoration through Partnership
Monday, November 10
10am-12pm

Ecological restoration is always complex, even more so when dealing with a large area or contaminated site.  Explore how these experts in restoration formed partnerships and critical external relationships to make success possible.

Moderator:  Ashley Ossher, Conservation Biologist, Wildlife Habitat Council

Presenters:

  • “Innovative Remediation and Habitat Restoration Approaches on Corporate Lands: A Case Study of Wetland Mitigation in a Heavily Industrialized Waterfront,” Mark S. Laska, Ph.D., President and CEO, Great Ecology
  • “Wetland and Stream Restoration in the Chicago Wilderness Region: Partnerships and Connections,” Tom Slowinski, Vice President, Wetlands and Ecology
  • “Achieving Resource Management Goals Through Public/Private Partnerships ,” Steve Hallmark, Program Manager, Sacramento Municipal Utility District; Eric Brown, Program Manager of Pacific Gas & Electric Company; Dr. Victoria Wojcik, Research Director, Pollinator Partnership

Panel Session 3: Protecting Species and Their Habitats
Tuesday, November 11
9am-12pm

Protecting species and their habitats allows corporations to keep the environment, whether in their backyards or elsewhere, at the forefront. Join us for a morning of case studies that will inform you about innovative techniques, collaborative partnerships and visions for protecting species and their habitats that extend beyond the fence line.

Moderator: Sumita Prasad, Director, Southwest Region, Wildlife Habitat Council

Presenters:

  • “Upper Blackfoot Confluence: A Conservation Partnership ,” Keith Allred, Director of Restoration Projects; Warren Colyer, The Common Interest
  • “Tricolored Blackbird conservation challenges in California,” Eric Davis, Assistant Regional Director for Migratory Birds and State Programs, Pacific Southwest Region, US Fish and Wildlife Service
  • “Planning and Implementation of a Bat Habitat Enhancement Project in Indiana – Regulatory Impetus, Corporate Stewardship, and Community Involvement,” Andrea L. Fogg, Senior Manager, ENVIRON
  • “Amphibians Crossing! A Community Approach to Solving Road-Wildlife Conflicts,” MacKenzie Hall, Wildlife Biologist, Conserve Wildlife Foundation of NJ
  • “The Biodiversity Action Plan of Lafarge,” Jim Rushworth, VP Environment & Public Affairs Quarries – Aggregates & Concrete, Lafarge
  • “Engaging the Community in Wildlife Rehabilitation,” Dan King, Senior Business Process Advisor, ExxonMobil and Sharon Schmalz, Executive Director, The Wildlife Center of Texas

Panel Session 4: Habitat Remediation
Tuesday, November 11
9am-12pm

Explore the latest strategies and management practices in remediation as we bring together regulatory agencies, corporate partners, and consultants to explore how connecting through collaboration leads to successful conservation outcomes.

Moderator: Josiane Bonneau, Director of Field Programs, Wildlife Habitat Council

Presenters:

  • “Connecting Urban Landscapes: Discovering Profit in Ecosystem Services,” Eric S. Anderson, Project Manager, BBJ Group
  • “Integrating Ecological Enhancement Elements into Remedial Designs,” Vernon C. Burrows, Remediation Specialist II, BASF Corporation
  • “Don’t Call it Dirt! The Critical Connectivity Between Soil Science and Restoration Success,” Jonathan Weier, CH2MHill
  • “Unique Industry/Government Restoration Project Catalog: Leveraging Experience and Identifying Needs,” Barbara Goldsmith Ad-Hoc Industry Natural Resource Management Group, Steve Glomb, US Department of the Interior

Moderator: Melisa Friedland, Superfund Program Manager for Redevelopment, US EPA

Presenters:

  • “Ecological Reuse and Revitalization at the Landia Chemical Company Superfund Site,” Michele Mahoney, EPA TIFSD Ecological Land Use Coordinator; Bill Denman, EPA Region 4 Section Chief; Douglas Reid-Green, BASF Corporation

Panel Session 5: Native Plants for the Corporate Landscape
Tuesday, November 11
1:30-2:40pm

Native plants are the backbone of conservation project success. Explore the best ways to collect and grow native seed and acquire native plants for use in your corporate landscape—from cultivation to seed exchanges and beyond.

Moderator: Thelma Redick, Director of Conservation Education and Outreach, Wildlife Habitat Council

Presenters:

  • “Herbaceous Native Plant Propagation from Locally Collected Seed,” Mark B. Fiely, Horticulturist, Ernst Conservation Seed Co.
  • “Enhance Your Plants through Seed Exchanges,” Pat Schultz, Senior  Environmental Project Manager, General Motors Company

Panel Session 6: Managing Invasive Species
Tuesday, November 11
1:30-2:40pm

Invasive species come in many forms – plants, insects, animals—and all are major concerns to those restoring ecosystems. Learn of the techniques of several highly successful management programs in this critical, ongoing battle. 

Moderator: Robert Campbell,  Education Specialist, Habitat Council

Presenters:

  • “Ecological Restoration at Titan America’s Pensuco Complex,” Muhammad Khan, Area Manager, Titan America LLC
  • “Feral Hog Control,” Ken Darby, Environmental Specialist, Southern Nuclear Operating Company

Panel Session 7: Community Engagement through Partnerships
Tuesday, November 11
3-4:30pm

Discover why partnerships and collaboration must be a part of any successful conservation program. They connect people to nature, projects and resources, and also bring in new ideas and energy to conservation programs, large and small. 

Moderator: Martha Gruelle, Director, Huron to Erie Waterways Project, Wildlife Habitat Council

Presenters:

  • “Working Together in Creative Partnerships,” Beverly Forget, Senior Communications Advisor, Ontario Power Generation ; Mary Krupa-Clark, Director, Get-to-Know Program
  • “Ecological and Partnership Diversity:  Mutualism at Waste Management’s Orchard Ridge,” Clay Frazer, Senior Ecologist,  Eco-Resource Consulting, LLC for Waste Management