This Year’s Christmas Tree, Next Year’s Habitat

With the winter holiday season upon us and Christmas only a few days away, many living rooms and office lobbies are now decorated (or soon will be) with live evergreen Christmas trees. But once the holidays are over, what should we do with all of those trees? I suggest using them to create habitat! A […]

Make Monitoring Easy!

Monitoring is an important part of every habitat enhancement project. When you monitor a project after you’ve put it into place, you can track its progress and see what worked and what didn’t, and then use that information when making future management decisions for the project. Making note of the wildlife you see using your […]

National Bat Week 2014

My colleagues and friends are all pretty familiar with my fondness for bats. With their fuzzy backs and twitchy little ears – not to mention their penchant for eating the mosquitos that eat me alive every summer- what’s not to love? I’ve even written about them several times already for the Wildlife Blog, such as […]

The Many Benefits of Urban Trees

Last week I read a fascinating article about urban forestry, which argued that strategically reforesting a 1.5-square-mile area in Houston could help reduce ozone pollution in the city. Using weather data and computer models, researchers estimated that a freshly-grown forest could remove as much as 310 tons of ozone from the atmosphere over the course […]

Providing Homes for Burrowing Owls

WHC member Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold Inc. recently partnered up with WHC’s Tucson office and the Arizona-based raptor rescue organization Wild at Heart to construct artificial burrows for rescued burrowing owls at Freeport’s Safford Operations facility. Freeport produced a video about this project and gave us permission to share it. You can watch the video […]

10 Native Vines to Attract Butterflies in North America

Native vines are an important but often overlooked component of butterfly habitat. Many vines serve as larval host plants (food sources) for caterpillars. They provide cover for butterflies and caterpillars, and the flowers provide nectar for butterflies (and many other pollinators, including hummingbirds). Most native vines also have attractive foliage and colorful flowers that would […]

The Night I Saw an Eastern Tiger Salamander

Way back in college I took a Herpetology class, which included four outdoor field trips. One of my fondest memories from that class is our nighttime field trip to a large vernal pool in a nearby forest. There was, of course, an abundance of spring peepers and other tree frogs, complete with the cacophony of […]

Wildlife in Winter: Now You See Me…

It just snowed (again) out here on the East Coast, so it seems only fitting that I wrap up our “Wildlife in Winter” blog series by talking about how some animals camouflage themselves in the winter to blend in with snow. In the warm months, species like the snowshoe hare sport a brown fur coat […]

Wildlife in Winter: Catching Prey Under the Snow

Last week I wrote about how some animals like voles, mice, and shrews utilize subnivean habitats as a way to stay warm and avoid being seen by predators while they forage. Of course, predators need to eat too. And while the snow allows the rodents to stay out of sight, there are several predators such […]

Wildlife in Winter: Finding Cover Under the Snow

Here in the Mid-Atlantic region, we’ve been experiencing snowfall on almost a weekly basis for the last month or so.  And while all this snow causes school shutdowns and traffic headaches for us, some of the local small mammals, like voles, mice, and shrews, do very well by staying beneath the snow. This type of […]
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